10 Study Tips for the Fall/Winter

10 Study Tips for the Fall/Winter

Friday, November 2nd - Sofia A. 

The fall time has arrived and with the winter semester peaking just around the corner, we can say goodbye to hot summer days. With the incoming cold winds, rainy and shorter days, motivation for studying and going to class can definitely diminish. Here are ten tips, skills and techniques to stay motivated during these upcoming wintry months.

  1. Are you feeling cold and gloomy?

The end of the fall semester and the beginning of the winter semester can seem like a cold and gloomy time of year. With less exposure to sunlight, thanks to daylight savings, the body and mind can start to become lethargic. This can make studying and concentrating on course work difficult and overwhelming. Our bodies crave that extra energy and vitamins it is not getting from the sun. Some of these vitamins that we are lacking from the sun can be replaced in our bodies by eating colourful fruits and vegetables. Adding in a delicious salad or refreshing smoothie to your day will pump your body with the renewed vitamins and energy needed to get studying.

  1. Let’s get comfy!

Snuggle up with your favourite blanket and make yourself a lovely cup of tea. Feeling comfy and cozy in your study environment is a must in the winter months. Boost the heater and put on your favourite pair of fuzzy socks. Don’t let the cold and bitter winter allow irritation and procrastination to set in. Find the right balance between comfort and motivation, making sure you don’t become too comfortable and become sluggish and unmotivated, to create your study space the way it works best for you. Don’t let the winter blues get you down!

  1. Let the light in!

Find the sunniest spot and park yourself in it! Did you know that there is actually a condition called SAD – seasonal affective disorder? A disorder that occurs in places where there is less or no sunlight at all in certain times of the year. Lower exposure to light effects the serotonin levels in your body causing you to feel worn out, unmotivated and sluggish. Getting as much sunlight as possible is ideal in the cold winter months. Next time you are getting ready to study try sitting near a window during daylight hours, take a break and walk outside or open up your curtain and let that light-fill up your room.

  1. Treat Yo’ Self!!

Course work can seem like an uphill battle once assignments, midterms, and exams begin to pile up. One way to stay motivated is to reward and treat yourself. Reward yourself by making yourself a big pot of soup to stay warm, boil some water and make a cup of hot chocolate, get in touch with your baking side and make a seasonal apple or pumpkin pie. Fuel your study session with some yummy seasonal snacks and make sure to treat yourself for your hard work.

  1. Bundle up and get outdoors!

Grab that Kendall Jenner puffer jacket and get outside for some fresh air. Even fifteen minutes outside can revive your body. This can make a huge difference to your productivity and motivation during these gloomy few months.

  1.  Bring the outdoors inside!

Another way to counter SAD is to try and bring the outdoors inside. Fill your study space with plants and flowers and bring some life into your study environment. Houseplants improve air quality by absorbing carbon dioxide and emitting oxygen, helping you feel more awake and focused.

  1.  Weather friendly exercises…?

We all know that it is difficult to motivate yourself to leave the house in the winter months, let alone find time to exercise. However, it is shown that exercise can have the greatest’s benefits during these times. Exercising lifts your mood and refuels your energy levels allowing you to get that brain power flowing needed for studying. Going to the gym, doing some exercises at home, going for a walk, or any sort of exercise can increase motivation.

  1.  Know your peak time.

Everyone has their own studying methods. Different techniques work differently for each individual person. The key is to find the routine that best fits your needs. Making a routine that you can stick to will help you find a studying pattern that suits your habits. Knowing when your brain and body has just had enough of studying will help you to appropriately schedule your priorities.

  1.  Take a Break.

And when you know you have just had enough of studying…… take a break. Planning breaks in to your study schedule can help remind you that success just takes a little bit of planning and hard work. Not every day in the fall and winter is cold and rainy. On those surprising sunny days with clear blue skies make sure to take some time and enjoy the moment. There is a lot of research on memory that states that distributing studying time helps you learn better. The more you spread out that study time the more likely you are to remember information later. So, grab a Kit Kat…. and take a break J

  1. Get your sleep!

Research suggests that if you study new material before you fall asleep, you remember that information much better than if you were to study new material and stay awake for a long period of time. The famous Dalai Lama once said, “sleep is the best meditation”.  

No matter how stressed or anxious you may be feeling during these winter months, remember there is a light at the end of the tunnel spring and summer will be here before you know it…. You’ve got this!

 

References

 

Institute, A. (2018). Figure 2f from: Irimia R, Gottschling M (2016) Taxonomic revision of Rochefortia Sw. (Ehretiaceae, Boraginales). Biodiversity Data Journal 4: E7720. https://doi.org/10.3897/BDJ.4.e7720. doi:10.3897/bdj.4.e7720.figure2f

                                                      

Markman, A. (n.d.). Figure 2f from: Irimia R, Gottschling M (2016) Taxonomic revision of Rochefortia Sw. (Ehretiaceae, Boraginales). Biodiversity Data Journal 4: E7720. https://doi.org/10.3897/BDJ.4.e7720. doi:10.3897/bdj.4.e7720.figure2f

 

Massey, T. (2015). Figure 2f from: Irimia R, Gottschling M (2016) Taxonomic revision of Rochefortia Sw. (Ehretiaceae, Boraginales). Biodiversity Data Journal 4: E7720. https://doi.org/10.3897/BDJ.4.e7720. doi:10.3897/bdj.4.e7720.figure2f

 

Maurice, Y. (2018). Figure 2f from: Irimia R, Gottschling M (2016) Taxonomic revision of Rochefortia Sw. (Ehretiaceae, Boraginales). Biodiversity Data Journal 4: E7720. https://doi.org/10.3897/BDJ.4.e7720. doi:10.3897/bdj.4.e7720.figure2f

 

Pfänder, A. (2017). Figure 2f from: Heller K, Rulik B (2016) Ctenosciara alexanderkoenigi sp. n.(Diptera: Sciaridae), an exotic invader in Germany? Biodiversity Data Journal 4: E6460. https://doi.org/10.3897/BDJ.4.e6460. doi:10.3897/bdj.4.e6460.figure2f